Henri Matisse,   Red Room (Harmony in Red),   spring-summer 1908 Oil on canvas 180,  5 × 221 cm  e State Hermitage Museum,   St Petersburg © Succession H. Matisse Photo © St Petersburg,    e State Hermitage Museum,   2016

Henri Matisse, Red Room (Harmony in Red), spring-summer 1908 Oil on canvas 180, 5 × 221 cm e State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg © Succession H. Matisse Photo © St Petersburg, e State Hermitage Museum, 2016

ICONS OF MODERN ART — THE SHCHUKIN COLLECTION
From 22 October 2016 to 20 February 2017
Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris

The exhibition pays tribute to one of the greatest art patrons of the early 20th century, Sergei Shchukin, the visionary Russian collector of French modern art.
From 1898, Sergei Shchukin, a leading Moscow industrialist, quickly became an integral member of the Parisian arts milieu of the era, forging relationships with modern art dealers Paul Durand-Ruel, Ambroise Vollard, and Berthe Weill, then Georges Bernheim and Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler. His friendship with celebrated artists like Henri Matisse heavily influenced the formation of his collection, one of the most radical of its time.
Thanks to the generous participation of the State Hermitage Museum and the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, who participated in the conception of the project, the exhibition will present a significant ensemble of 127 major pieces by Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and Modern masters from the Shchukin collection. ere will be a particular emphasis on the art of Monet, Ce?zanne, Gauguin, Rousseau, Derain, Matisse, and Picasso, alongside works from Degas, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Van Gogh.
The exhibition also details the impact of the Shchukin collection on the formation of the Cubo-Futurist, Suprematist, and Constructivist movements presenting 30 works 28 paintings, collages, constructions, and reliefs, as well as 2 sculptures. e works are by major artists of the Russian avant-garde (from the Tretyakov State Gallery, the Thessaloniki State Museum of Contemporary Art, the Pushkin Museum, the Stedeljik Museum, and MoMA). The exhibition includes masterpieces by Malevich, Rodchenko, Larionov, Tatlin, Kliun, Goncharova, Popova, and Rozanova.

The exhibition will also provide the opportunity for academic review and will be accompanied by a catalogue. A symposium will be held in February 2017 which will bring together an international community of researchers who will examine the role of the great collectors of modern and contemporary art of the 19th and 20th century.

Paul Ce?zanne,   Pierrot and Harlequin (Mardi Gras),   1888–1890 Oil on canvas 102 × 81 cm  e Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts,   Moscow Photo © Moscow,    e Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts

Paul Ce?zanne, Pierrot and Harlequin (Mardi Gras), 1888–1890 Oil on canvas 102 × 81 cm e Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow Photo © Moscow, e Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts

Allison Katz | We boil at different degrees | The Approach
18 Sept 2016 – 23rd Oct 2016

Fantasies, autobiographical digressions, myth, language: freely weaving these themes within a sensibility defined by flux and interrogation Allison Katz creates an eclectic range of reference able to link a timeless imagery to the present moment. Her art oscillates from geometric abstraction to fascinating realism to a seductive figuration and we are immediately caught into this spiral of associations where there is no apparent truth. The exhibition features a selection of nine paintings from 2016, apart from Cabbage (and Philip), which is from 2013: through the overall display, which presents alternated micro and macro Katz puts emphasis on the physicality and psychology of scale, a crucial point of communication within painting’s constraints.

Allison Katz,   We boil at different degrees,   The Approach,   London - Courtesy The Artist and The Approach,   London

Allison Katz, We boil at different degrees, The Approach, London – Courtesy The Artist and The Approach, London

AllisonKATZ — AKA
11.02. – 25.03.2016
Gió Marconi Gallery

For her first solo exhibition at the Gió Marconi Gallery, Allison Katz (b. 1980) created a site-specific architecture, installing her paintings among a series of triangulated temporary walls. By staging a series of revealing and concealing angles, the exhibition becomes a double path, allowing the viewer to experience contrasting visions within the same space.

Wanted Dead and Alive
You said you were struggling with a title… All Is On is a hard act to follow, Allison

AKA however makes perfect sense as a postscript

Rider, tailpiece, coda. The Also in AKA, something more to say, multiplicity, in excess of, urgently

While select imagery and techniques are repeated, the artist is never repetitive

(Repeating is fate & proves the subject is unstable. It demands of me as I demand of it)

(Also known as) preceding nicknames and pseudonyms, proposes a continuum of alternative identities as addendum. A stand-in for an originator. Alias as real extensions

The paintings themselves occupy the space of a moniker (What do you mean?)

Architecture is the abstraction, the paintings are the figures

I love how it works as an abbreviation which insinuates this back and forth that, am I right in recalling, you’re going to design the exhibition as a two-way route that will be read both forward and backward? So AKA as a palindrome…

Whereas the artist separated her forename into syllables to create the title ‘All Is On’ – the very pronunciation of which reverberates as an affirmation – here the act of naming is advanced upon by Katz’s apt recognition of the rotation of her own initials in AKA

Permutation and Allusion

Unfinished business

Keep CPR in your pocket for another time

Right-angled outcrops run the course of the gallery so that from one direction some are made visible while concealing others, which from the other end of the space are then made apparent. The paintings cannot face each other

Primordial cringe

Jagged architecture: seen and unseen simultaneously

Walls as screens. There have been in the past actual folding screens and other examples of freestanding walls, used each time as a way to get at the work from a different angle, literally

And Ms. Katz, the whole Schrödinger’s Cat link is a beautiful metaphorical conundrum for the alive/dead cycle of painting too – existing in limbo. At worst it returns zombified. At best, it is resurrected, brimming with life. In your poster a dog watches a cat split into a quantum koan of simultaneity. Who can have eyes everywhere at once? Anyone with the wish

Acronyms as hymns. IRL

Mobile and pure repose. Not only my POV but equal to my body

Saim Demircan and

Allison Katz,   AKA,   Gio? Marconi,   2016,   Courtesy of the Gallery © ARMELLIN F.

Allison Katz, AKA, Gio? Marconi, 2016, Courtesy of the Gallery © ARMELLIN F.

Allison Katz,   AKA,   Gio? Marconi,   2016,   Courtesy of the Gallery © ARMELLIN F.

Allison Katz, AKA, Gio? Marconi, 2016, Courtesy of the Gallery © ARMELLIN F.