• Lucia Leuci, Tramonto lagunare (acqua salmastra), 2017 -Porcelain, resin, pigment, squid, purple cabbage essence, baking soda, glucose, insects Ø 30 x 7 cm - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan (detail)
  • Materia prima, Lucia Leuci, Installation view at Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan
  • Materia prima, Lucia Leuci, Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan
  • Lucia Leuci, Riso primavera, 2017, Porcelain, resin, pigment, rice, butter, beehive, honey, flowers, buds, insects Ø 30 x 7 cm - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan (detail)
  • Lucia Leuci, La battaglia degli scampi, 2017 - Porcelain,, resin, pigment, spaghetti, squid ink, quail bones, beet essence 62 x 30 x 25 cm - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan (detail)
  • Lucia Leuci, Tramonto lagunare (acqua salmastra), 2017 -Porcelain, resin, pigment, squid, purple cabbage essence, baking soda, glucose, insects Ø 30 x 7 cm - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan
  • Lucia Leuci, Notturno con eclissi, 2017, Porcelain, resin, pigment, tripe, flounder's skin, licorice powder, insects Ø 33 x 5 cm - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan (detail)

Segue la versione italiana

Lucia Leuci experiments with food’s aesthetic possibilities through four dishes set up in the cabinets at Fondazione Pini in Milan. The dining room becomes showcase for a mix of elements and puts the viewer in front of the strength of organic material and its non-stopping transformation.
The single elements become products of taste: food becomes object of desire, formal perfection and, at last, satisfaction for  the palate and placebo for hunger. The still lives mirror ongoing existence and the unstoppable process of natural matter subject to the passing of time.
The show, curated by /77 and supervised by Adrian Paci can be visited through July the 14th.

The nutritional act essentially is an act of research, and it’s always been like that, ever since the beginning of times, because man is born a hunter-harvester and the struggle (of research) is then far from eating and feeding, while the act of cooking comes right before that of feeding oneself. (Lucia Leuci, Materia prima)

ATP diary asked the artist some questions

Francesca D’Aria: The exhibited works are hosted inside of cabinets in an evocative and elegant place, which managed to keep up its identity as a house alongside the spirit of a museum. How do these works place themselves in the spaces of Fondazione Pini?

Lucia Leuci: With an analytical spirit, simply going along the halls’ nature: the glass cabinets had been created to showcase objects. This show essentially is an exhibition of everyday-life’s tools, which are in this case becoming neutral, potential spaces themselves, inside of a deeply characterised environment.
I saw the cabinets as self-sufficient space intervals in a potentially usable area rich in history and stories that “had happened”, all combining with contemporary times very well. This space is in fact characterised as a typical Milanese house of the XIX century, home to the artists in the Pini family’s atelier and centre for the promotion of Renzo Bongiovanni Radice’s work. This confirms how much Milan really is an “indoor” town, made of private spaces filled with happenings. These situations describe better than many words the reason why – not by chance – the novel “L’Adalgisa” by Carlo Emilio Gadda is subtitled as “Disegni milanesi” (Milanese drawings).

FD: How is the project Materia prima born? In which way did you work with the curators in /77 and Adrian Paci’ supervision?

LL: It has been quite some time now that I’ve been looking up in great admiration to some chef’s work, such as Keisuke Koga’s, Magnus Nilsson’s, Yoji Tokuyoshi’s, Anne-Sophie Pic’s and Pietro Leemann’s. I see their approach to cuisine, to dish composition and, last, to the research for raw materials as something very close not only to artistic practice but also to a certain absolute vision of the world. For these reasons, thanks to chef Sara Nicolosi’s precious contributions, I tried to “set the dishes up” almost as if they were single exhibitions, confined in their porcelain borders.
Adrian Paci chose /77 to curate a series of exhibitions at the Fondazione. They chose to show my work and have actively contributed to the various stages in the making of Materia prima.

Materia prima, Lucia Leuci, Installation view at Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan - - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

Materia prima, Lucia Leuci, Installation view at Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan – – Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi – Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

FD: The cabinets are hosting four dishes, gastronomic researches in which material, color, form give life to organic sculptures. Can you tell me about the elements and the suggestions tied to these four compositions you thought of?

LL: I’ve used these islands (comparing the dishes to islands) and filled them up with a show called “Materia prima”, along with its chain of inherent references.
In Riso primavera, Tramonto lagunare (acqua salmastra), La battaglia degli scampi and Notturno con eclissi food is not relevant for being food merely, but as the holder of an aesthetic significance. The various elements then become symbols and allegories of history as a collective experience.

FD: Which materials did you use to create your recipes?

LL: I’ve used organic materials, perishable and not lasting in time, as well as polyurethane resin, unalterable and permanent (made from casting real food, and overall very similar to the real ones). Sometimes I’ve also added some insect typical of this area. I think this choice might place some of these works in the “memento mori” category. So I have summarised – through the semantics they create in the viewer – food and objects in these dishes, which lyrical addition corresponds to poetry in three dimensions. My aesthetic research does indeed unfold through the use of very different materials and the resulting works are a formal synthesis of the process of perception, which is multiple in a single moment.

FD: Is there a path, a narrative joining these works together?

LL: I don’t believe so, at least not in the sense of narrative: I see each work as a self-sufficient island.

FD: How does experimenting through food place itself in your research and what interests you in the investigation of food through artistic practice?

LL: I’m interested in the aesthetic side of food. The composition of a dish is similar to the setting up of an exhibition. Cuisine and art are now brought together, but let’s not forget that every single aspect of living could be considered “art”. In this way, I see artistic practice as a permanent experience.

FD: What’s raw material to you?

LL: A site-specific project for the Fondazione Adolfo Pini. I’ve explored areas tied to the food serving industry, which is something unusual form my artistic experience.

Lucia Leuci, La battaglia degli scampi, 2017 - Porcelain,, resin, pigment, spaghetti, squid ink, quail bones, beet essence 62 x 30 x 25 cm - Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

Lucia Leuci, La battaglia degli scampi, 2017 – Porcelain,, resin, pigment, spaghetti, squid ink, quail bones, beet essence
62 x 30 x 25 cm – Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi – Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

Materia prima – Intervista con Lucia Leuci 

Lucia Leuci sperimenta le possibilità estetiche del cibo, attraverso quattro pietanze collocate nelle teche della Fondazione Pini a Milano. La sala da pranzo diventa vetrina di una combinazione di elementi e pone l’osservatore dinnanzi alla forza del materiale organico e alla sua incessante trasformazione. Gli alimenti mutano in prodotti del gusto: il nutrimento diventa oggetto del desiderio, perfezione formale e, solo in ultimo, soddisfazione per il palato e placebo per la fame. Le nature morte riflettono la vita in divenire e l’inarrestabile processo dell’oggetto naturale sottoposto al passaggio del tempo. Il percorso, curato da /77 e supervisionato da Adrian Paci, è visitabile fino al 14 luglio.

L’atto alimentare è essenzialmente un atto di ricerca, lo è sempre stato, fin dall’inizio dei tempi, perché l’uomo nasce come cacciatore-raccoglitore e lo sforzo (di ricerca) è dunque molto distante dal mangiare a dell’alimentarsi, viceversa quello di cucinare è il gesto immediatamente precedente a quello del nutrirsi. (Lucia Leuci, Materia prima)

ATPDiary ha posto alcune domande all’artista —

Francesca D’Aria: Le opere in esposizione sono ospitate all’interno di teche in un luogo suggestivo ed elegante che ha curato e mantenuto l’identità di una casa, con lo spirito però di un museo. Come si inseriscono negli spazi della Fondazione Pini i tuoi lavori?

Lucia Leuci: Con spirito analitico, semplicemente seguendo la natura degli interni: le teche di cristallo sono state create per esporre oggetti. La mostra è essenzialmente un’esposizione di strumenti quotidiani, che in questo caso diventano spazi neutri, potenziali, all’interno di un’ambiente fortemente caratterizzato.
Ho visto le vetrine come intervalli indipendenti in un’area potenzialmente sfruttabile e ricca di storia e di storie “successe” che ben si conciliano con la contemporaneità. Lo spazio infatti si caratterizza per essere una residenza milanese del tardo ‘800, già sede dello studio di artisti della famiglia Pini e centro di valorizzazione di Renzo Bongiovanni Radice. Questo conferma ancora di più come Milano sia una città di “interni”, di spazi privati colmi d’avvenimento. Situazioni simili spiegano meglio di tante parole come – non a caso – il romanzo “L’Adalgisa” di Carlo Emilio Gadda, porti come sottotitolo “Disegni milanesi”.

FD: Come nasce il progetto Materia prima? In che modo hai lavorato con i curatori di 77 e la supervisione di Adrian Paci?

LL: È da diverso tempo che guardo con grande ammirazione il lavoro di alcuni chef, come per esempio Keisuke Koga, Magnus Nilsson, Yoji Tokuyoshi, Anne-Sophie Pic e Pietro Leemann. Ritengo il loro approccio alla cucina, alla composizione dei piatti e – infine – alla ricerca delle materie prime, non solo molto simile alla pratica artistica, ma anche ad una visione totalizzante del mondo. Pertanto, insieme al prezioso contributo della chef Sara Nicolosi, ho provato ad “allestire dei piatti”, quasi fossero singole mostre, circoscritte nei bordi della porcellana.
Adrian Paci ha selezionato progetto /77 per la curatela di una serie di mostre presso la Fondazione. Loro hanno scelto di presentare il mio lavoro e hanno collaborato attivamente alle diverse fasi di realizzazione di Materia prima.

Lucia Leuci, Riso primavera, 2017, Porcelain, resin, pigment, rice, butter, beehive, honey, flowers, buds, insects Ø 30 x 7 cm -  Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

Lucia Leuci, Riso primavera, 2017, Porcelain, resin, pigment, rice, butter, beehive, honey, flowers, buds, insects Ø 30 x 7 cm – Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi – Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

FD: Le vetrine ospitano quattro pietanze, ricerche culinarie in cui materia, colore, forma generano delle sculture organiche. Mi racconti nello specifico gli elementi, e le suggestioni, legati ai quattro piatti che hai pensato?

LL: Ho adoperato queste isole (paragonando i piatti a delle isole) per colmarli di una mostra intitolata “Materia prima”, con tutta la catena di riferimenti che ne comporta.
In Riso primavera, Tramonto lagunare (acqua salmastra), La battaglia degli scampi e Notturno con eclissi il cibo è importante nella misura in cui è significato non alimentare, ma estetico. I vari elementi diventano dunque anche simboli e allegorie della storia come esperienza collettiva.

FD: Di quali materiali ti sei servita per creare le tue ricette?

LL: Ho utilizzato sia materiali organici, quindi deperibili e non durevoli nel tempo, che resina poliuretanica, dunque inalterabile e permanente (positivi di calchi di alimenti del tutto simili al vero). Talvolta ho inserito anche degli insetti autoctoni. Credo che questa scelta collochi alcune opere nella categoria del “memento mori”. Ho quindi riassunto cibo e oggetti – ovvero tramite il campo semantico che essi creano nell’osservatore – dei piatti la cui addizione lirica corrisponde ad una poesia tridimensionale. La mia ricerca estetica si snoda infatti attraverso l’utilizzo di materiali molto distanti tra di loro, le opere in questione sono sintesi formale del processo percettivo il quale è molteplice in uno stesso istante.

FD: Esiste un percorso, una narrazione, che lega le quattro opere?

LL: Non credo, almeno nel senso della narrazione: vedo ogni opera come un’isola indipendente.

FD: In che modo si inserisce nella tua ricerca la sperimentazione attraverso il cibo e cosa ti interessa indagare negli alimenti attraverso la pratica artistica?

LL: Mi interessa la parte estetica del cibo. Pertanto la composizione del piatto è simile all’allestimento di una mostra. Cucina e arte sono ormai accostati, ma non dimentichiamo che ogni parte del vissuto potrebbe essere considerata “arte”. In questo senso vedo la pratica artistica come un’esperienza permanente.

FD: Cos’è per te la Materia prima?

LL: Un progetto site-specific per la Fondazione Adolfo Pini. Ho esplorato ambiti legati alla ristorazione, un mondo insolito per la mia esperienza artistica.

Lucia Leuci, Notturno con eclissi, 2017, Porcelain, resin, pigment, tripe, flounder's skin, licorice powder, insects Ø 33 x 5 cm -  Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi - Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan

Lucia Leuci, Notturno con eclissi, 2017, Porcelain, resin, pigment, tripe, flounder’s skin, licorice powder, insects Ø 33 x 5 cm – Photo credit Laura Fantacuzzi – Courtesy Fondazione Adolfo Pini, Milan