Andrés Pereira Paz: Blue Eyes Installation view at The RYDER, London Photo: Tom Carter

Andrés Pereira Paz: Blue Eyes Installation view at The RYDER, London Photo: Tom Carter

Andrés Pereira — Paz ‘Blue Eyes’
The Ryder
11 May – 16 June 2018

This is the first solo exhibition of the Bolivian artist in UK. His work focuses on how the circulation of people and information affects national, regional and global imaginaries, revealing the construction of identity to be an ongoing and often contradictory process. The sculpture ‘Blue Eyes’ (after the inca experience), (2016), an amorphous unanimated creature standing on four trekking sticks is shown alongside the video ‘Tour’, the textile piece ‘Manners and Accessions’ and some recent collages and drawings, all exploring this overlap of contemporary narratives and identity politics.

Blue Eyes (after the inca experience), 2016, Andrés Pereira Paz, Hand embroidered blue eyes on Tarabucco textile and trecking sticks - Variable dimensions - Photo: Tom Carter

Blue Eyes (after the inca experience), 2016, Andrés Pereira Paz, Hand embroidered blue eyes on Tarabucco textile and trecking sticks – Variable dimensions – Photo: Tom Carter

 

Bold Tendencies
12th Summer Programme
The focus for this year’s art commissions at vibrant venue in the Peckham brutalist multi-storey car park is Ecology and the commissioned artists are: Johann Arens, Sian Lyn Hutchings, Irina Kirchuk, Lawrence Lek, Arjuna Neuman, João Vasco Paiva, Sterling Ruby, Emilija Škarnulytė, Jenna Sutela and Richard Wentworth. Each new commission approaches the question of Ecology in the contemporary world in its own terms: from organic elements to algorithmic patterns, sonic wormholes to vibrant skylines, representing a diverse field of aesthetic and conceptual approach.

Bold Tendencies - 12th Summer Programme

Bold Tendencies – 12th Summer Programme

Ben Rivers  — Ghost Strata
Matt’s Gallery
26 May – 3 June 2018

For his second exhibition at the gallery Ben Rivers presents a new film, which is the first instalment of an ongoing project that will be developed and completed over the remaining months of 2018. A meditation which explores the differing scales of impact that humanity’s presence on the earth has in the present and into the future, representing memory through visual fragments. The work, which follows the artist’s itinerant life, has been filmed in various locations including São Paulo, Krabi in Thailand and Nottingham in the UK and it embodies the spirit of exploration and active research that has come to characterise Ben Rivers’ practice.

Ben Rivers, Ghost Strata, 2018, film still. Image courtesy of the artist, Kate MacGarry, London and Matt’s Gallery, London

Ben Rivers, Ghost Strata, 2018, film still. Image courtesy of the artist, Kate MacGarry, London and Matt’s Gallery, London

Abigail Reynolds  — The Universal Now and further episodes
Peer UK

23 April – 23 June 2018

Hosted by Peer gallery, ‘The Universal Now and Further Episodes’ is spread across three venues in London, with works displayed at the gallery itself as well as Shoreditch Library and the nearby Bookartbookshop. The three-way exhibition features a new film installation drawing on the artist’s recent journey in search of the lost libraries of the Silk Road, a new large-scale sculptural commission for PEER plus collage, sculpture and print works made over the past decade; ’When Words are Forgotten’ a delicate, leaning metal framework containing a ‘library of glass’, that spans the width of the first gallery window.

Abigail Reynolds, The Universal Now and further episodes - Photo Stephen White - Courtesy Peer, London

Abigail Reynolds, The Universal Now and further episodes – Photo Stephen White – Courtesy Peer, London

Abigail Reynolds, The Universal Now and further episodes - Photo Stephen White - Courtesy Peer, London

Abigail Reynolds, The Universal Now and further episodes – Photo Stephen White – Courtesy Peer, London

Boris Mikhailov  — yesterday’s sandwich
Sprovieri Gallery
16 May – 23 June 2018

The exhibition focuses on the first series conceived by Boris Mikhailov, ‘Superimpositions’, also called by Mikhailov ‘Butterbrot’ (Sandwich). This body of works, realised between the late ’60s and early ‘70s when these could not be published or shown publicly, presents us the extraordinary double world of Soviet drudgery juxtaposed with sex, beauty, war, and everyday life.

Mikhailov’s language is an uncompromising and playful view of the beauty and the grotesque of an era. His tireless investigations into photographic techniques and styles, as well as his frequent alternation between conceptual and documentary work, have contributed to make him the most prominent photographer to emerge from the former Soviet Union in the past 20 years.

Boris Mikhailov: Yesterday’s Sandwich  Installation view at Sprovieri, London, 2018  Courtesy the Artist and Sprovieri  Photo © Deniz Güzel

Boris Mikhailov: Yesterday’s Sandwich Installation view at Sprovieri, London, 2018 Courtesy the Artist and Sprovieri Photo © Deniz Güzel

Boris Mikhailov: Yesterday’s Sandwich  Installation view at Sprovieri, London, 2018  Courtesy the Artist and Sprovieri

Boris Mikhailov: Yesterday’s Sandwich Installation view at Sprovieri, London, 2018 Courtesy the Artist and Sprovieri

Gabriele Cappelli 
Cadogan Contemporary
May 14th – 8th June

The new series of painting by Italian painter Gabriele Cappelli are spread over the Mayfair gallery, distilling Classical aesthetic concepts and modernist abstract forms. Clean and powerful, his compositions of earthy colours layered with gold dust generate a sense of a universal aesthetic language. Paintings become like a symbol of painting, thanks to artist’s intricate juxtaposition of colour and form, elegiac in tempo and precise in use of colour, in unison with the idea of Abstract.

Gabriele Cappelli, Composition 168 - 75x90 cm - Courtesy Cadogan Contemporary, London

Gabriele Cappelli, Composition 168 – 75×90 cm – Courtesy Cadogan Contemporary, London

Gabriele Cappelli, Composition 177 - 120x180 cm - Courtesy Cadogan Contemporary, London

Gabriele Cappelli, Composition 177 – 120×180 cm – Courtesy Cadogan Contemporary, London